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Posts Tagged ‘Amy Newman’

Mark Levin uses brash commentary, compared to CNN.com

March 6, 2011 Leave a comment

Photo taken from CNN.com

When the union leader protests began at the capitol of Wisconsin in February 2011 in reaction to Republican Governor Scott Walker’s bill, it sparked a controversy across the nation that ideologically divided many, especially in the media.  The proposed bill would diminish bargaining rights for public workers and require them to pay more towards their health care and pensions in order to shrink a $3.6 billion deficit.  Among those divided are two news sources: The Mark Levin Show on the radio, a bold conservative show, and CNN.com, a more ideologically neutral source, with hints of liberal lean.  These two sources reported on the protests using very different approaches to cover the topic and differing frames to present their news that in some way are consistent with their respective political sides.  Those on the right believe the public union employees are being freeloaders and stealing from the taxpayers, while those on the left feel public union employees’ rights are being imposed on by the government.  The two stories compared in this paper were both breaking stories for both sources; CNN broke the story first on February 16th while Levin aired it the next day on February 17th.  

The Mark Levin Show‘s History and Demographics

Mark Levin is one of America’s preeminent conservative commentators with his conservative talk radio show, The Mark Levin Show. His radio show began in 2002 on Sunday afternoons on WABC.  In 2003, he obtained the competitive daily 6-8pm time slot.  Within the first 18 months, he became the number one show on the AM dial and eventually in 2009, he was given an extra hour.  In 2006, Citadel Media, formerly ABC Radio Networks, took over the syndication of the show.  Citadel Media is owned by Citadel Broadcasting Corporation, a radio-only media corporation and the third largest radio group in the U.S.

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Categories: final paper Tags: ,

Blog #13: Researching the Mark Levin radio program

February 23, 2011 Leave a comment


For our final project, we are working with the Mark Levin radio show as the alternative new source.  Levin’s program is heavily aimed at the right side of the news spectrum, with a website splashed in red, white and blue and pictures of soaring eagles.  Many of the current headlines are strong criticisms about Obama’s new budget proposal, and most other headlines seem to stay at home in the United States.  Because this program is so conservative, we will most likely pin it against a more liberal mainstream news site, such as CNN radio.  Both of these sites will be good tools for research.

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Categories: #12 Tags: ,

Denver Post reporter consistently frames marijuana issue

February 15, 2011 1 comment

The current issue of medical marijuana has been a very central one for people in Colorado for the past couple of years.  Since the passing of the initial bill that made it legal, there have been many debates and revisions to the bill.  One journalist for the Denver Post, John Ingold, has been tracking the issue since its start, and his opinions appear (although subtly) through the way he frames his stories.

On February 11th, the Denver Post published another article written by Ingold about the public hearing about proposed revisions to the medical marijuana regulation bill.  The debate about the bill had begun with certain proposed changes to the industry, but the bill had been rewritten to deal with other issues. 

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Categories: #9, Uncategorized Tags:

Cox Communications may need to update with the digital times

February 3, 2011 1 comment

Image taken from Wikipedia.org

Cox Communications is the third-largest cable television provider in the United States and the ranked the fifth in the top worldwide MSOs, with just over 5 million subscribers.  This telecomm provider is a privately owned subsidiary of Cox Enterprises and offer cable, internet and phone to its subscribers.  The company appears to have some very moral intentions around the communities they provide service for.  There are several communities in California with middle schools that have received grants for technology from Cox Communications.  A couple weeks ago, the company donated over 8,000 meals to the homeless and underserved in Orange County.  At the same time, at the San Diego headquarter, the company completed an alternative energy project.  Cox Communications seems to have a lot of their interest set on the community.  But that isn’t to say that it doesn’t have problems just like any other MSO.      

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Categories: #7, Cable MSOs Tags:

That 70s Show creates stereotypical 70s subtexts – rewrite

February 3, 2011 Leave a comment

 

Members of the cast of That 70s Show

That 70s Show is a sitcom, comedy show that is supposed to personify the lives of teenagers growing up in the culturally explosive and rebellious period of the 70s.  The show follows six high-school kids from the made-up town of Point Place, Wisconsin.  The point-of-view of the show is through the eyes of these rebellious, rock n’ roll-loving teenagers that (supposedly) show the fun-loving side of the 70s: drinking beers, smoking marijuana, listening to rock music and cruising around in the car with friends.  The audience expects this fun-loving part of the show because many of these viewers grew up in the 70s and find the show to be a fond reflection of that decade.      

Print media, such as the NY Daily Times and CNN.com have ran stories about the termination of the show and current status of the actors.  The show debuted on the Fox network in 1998, but since then it has aired on many other broadcast and cable outlets, such as ABC Family and MTV.  

The ambiance of the 70s is definitely over stereo-typed in this show.  Although the “love generation” culture was a big part of the 70s, not everywhere in the United States were going through the same revelations of the 70s as Point Place is in the show.  Many of these stereo-types insinuate certain subtexts in the show that, while obvious to the viewer, are also what make the show appealing to those viewers.

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Categories: #3, Media grammar Tags:

The winners of the Wikis

January 27, 2011 Leave a comment

The three smartphones in competition (the iPhone, Android and Blackberry) all have their own personal styles and followers in the market, so it’s sometimes difficult to compare.  While it’s clear that the iPhone dominates in the market, I believe that there is room for competition.  The Blackberry’s time came and went with the introduction of the iPhone, but the Blackberry will always have its followers (especially in the business world).  However, I think that the Android operating system could take over the market as the leading smartphone.  It has a similar touch screen interface as the iPhone, but there is much more depth to the operating system (Linux) and lots of room for the phone to constantly grow and evolve because it’s open source which means people anywhere can make apps or improvements for the Android phone.  While I think the Android has a persuasive argument, there is definite substance to the argument on the Blackberry Wiki page.  The recommendations for updating the workability of the Blackberry are very important and could be simple fixes that would perhaps give them another boost in the marketplace.  The Blackberry Torch is comparable to many of the other leading smartphones out there, so it looks like the Blackberry company has been working towards those improvements.

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Categories: #5, #6, wiki Tags: ,

That 70s Show creates stereotypical 70s subtexts

January 13, 2011 3 comments

That 70s Show is a sitcom, comedy show that is supposed to personify the lives of teenagers growing up in the culturally explosive and rebellious period of the 70s.  The show follows six high-school kids from the made-up town of Point Place, Wisconsin.  The point of view of the show is through the eyes of these rebellious rock n’ roll-loving teenagers that (supposedly) shows the fun-loving side of the 70s: drinking beers, smoking marijuana, listening to rock and cruising around in the car with friends.  The audience expects this fun-loving part of the show because many of these viewers grew up in the 70s and find the show to be a fond reflection of that decade.      

Print media, such as the NY Daily Times and CNN.com have ran stories about the ending of the show and where the actors are now.  The show debuted on the Fox network in 1998, but since then it has aired on many other broadcast and cable outlets, such as ABC Family and MTV.  

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Categories: #3, Media grammar Tags: ,