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Blog 14

Time-space compression is one of the most influential changes telecommunication networks have brought to our social and political lives. Time-space compression is defended in the book as “the idea that electronic communications has essentially reduced distances between people because of nearly instataneous communication, which has also ‘sped up’ our notions of time.” The very first form of government communication was the postal system. The postal system was, and still is, supported by taxes and charges for delivery and is a monopoly governed by the government. Private companies soon became a competitor to the US Postal Service when they began to string telegraph wires cost to coast. These lines later transformed into telephone lines. The telegraph lines allowed for private companies to provide a service to the people, without any sort of government regulation. Internet today is very similar to telegraph lines from the 19th century. Companies like Comcast, Verision, AT&T, and AOL all provide paid internet services to the public. Competition amongst the multiple internet service providers helps to encourage faster, better internet. This positive competition is beneficial to consumers. If the government were to take over the internet, creating a monopoly like the US Postal Service, net neutrality would be jeopardized. The internet is a wonderful resource, as people are able to execute their freedom of speech in nearly any way they feel necessary. If the government were to become involved, this would be limited, changing the internet forever.

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