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Blog #9

I found an article on the New York Times website talking about the Carmelo Anthony trade dilemma. If you aren’t a sport’s fan and know nothing about what has been happening to the Denver Nuggets franchise player well I’ll give you some quick background information. Carmelo Anthony opted out of a 3-year $65 deal to return to the Denver Nuggets this past summer. He currently has one more season left with the nuggets till he is a free agent this up coming summer.  After all the hype about Carmelo not being happy and wanting to head elsewhere for the 2011-2012 season preferably the New York Nicks the media has taken this story for a crazy ride with so many twist an turns no one knows what’s really going on.

On Tuesday rumors spread that the LA Lakers where now a team that might possibly want to make a trade for the Nuggets superstar which would include two players from the Lakers, one a rookie who was drafted in the second round and the second was there star center Andrew Bynum.  After reading and analyzing the main point’s in this article I wanted to be sure that I kept framing in mind.  When it comes to sports journalism I feel that there is a lot of framing going on with each story especially because there seem to be new pieces of information constantly being thrown into the puzzle. A perfect example is one of Cam Newton the Heisman wining quarter back at Auburn. It was said that is dad had accepted illegal bribes of $250,000 dollars if he talked to his son about going to Mississippi State. Cam was never found guilty. With each article there were different types of framing because each journalist singled to news that the consumers might find important or might be interested in whether it was correct or not. With framing journalist need to decided what pieces of information they can use that will help emphasize the main points that both supports the story but also makes it reliable for instance the facts that go inside the story.

With this article about trading Carmelo to the Lakers I found that the journalist framed the story and didn’t put reliable information in it a perfect example is a statement from the article saying “Two Lakers officials, who spoke on condition of anonymity, emphatically denied any interest in such a deal. Both publicly and privately, the Lakers insist they need Bynum to successfully defend their title.” I feel that the journalist framed this article to put more of a fear in the reader’s especially if you’re a nuggets fan.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/10/sports/basketball/10lakers.html?_r=1&ref=sports

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Categories: Uncategorized
  1. tessdoez
    February 24, 2011 at 5:45 am

    Alex,
    It is especially important that you don’t use an apostrophe to pluralize words. An apostrophe is only needed for contractions and possessives. Please edit this post with attention to that error specifically, and others. Also, framing is a bit different than putting unreliable or made up information in a story. Please review how the textbook explains it and rewrite your answer with a more nuanced conception of the idea in mind.

    • alextarnoczi09
      March 1, 2011 at 4:32 am

      Revised Version- I found an article on the New York Times website talking about the Carmelo Anthony trade dilemma. If you arent a sports fan and know nothing about what has been happening to the Denver Nuggets franchise player well Ill give you some quick background information. Carmelo Anthony opted out of a 3-year $65 deal to return to the Denver Nuggets this past summer. He currently has one more season left with the nuggets till he is a free agent this up coming summer. After all the hype about Carmelo not being happy and wanting to head elsewhere for the 2011-2012 season preferably the New York Nicks the media has taken this story for a crazy ride with so many twist an turns no one knows whats really going on.

      On Tuesday rumors spread that the LA Lakers where now a team that might possibly want to make a trade for the Nuggets superstar which would include two players from the Lakers, one a rookie who was drafted in the second round and the second was there star center Andrew Bynum. After reading and analyzing the main points in this article I wanted to be sure that I kept framing in mind. When it comes to sports journalism I feel that there is a lot of framing going on with each story especially because there seem to be new pieces of information constantly being thrown into the puzzle. A perfect example is one of Cam Newton the Heisman wining quarter back at Auburn. It was said that is dad had accepted illegal bribes of $250,000 dollars if he talked to his son about going to Mississippi State. Cam was never found guilty. With each article there were different types of framing because each journalist singled to news that the consumers might find important or might be interested in whether it was correct or not. With framing journalist need to decided what pieces of information they can use that will help emphasize the main points that both supports the story but also makes it reliable for instance the facts that go inside the story.

      With this article about trading Carmelo to the Lakers I found that the journalist framed the story and did not put reliable information in it. A perfect example is a statement from the article saying two Lakers officials, who spoke on condition of anonymity, emphatically denied any interest in such a deal. Both publicly and privately, the Lakers insist they need Bynum to successfully defend their title. I feel that the journalist framed this article to put more of a fear in the readers especially if you are a nuggets fan.Framing is defined in the book as every story is told in a particular way that influences how readers think of the story. In this case this article was framed by the author to maybe put fear into the denver fans making them believe that Carmelo Anthony there franchise player was possibly on the move.

      http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/10/sports/basketball/10lakers.html?_r=1&ref=sports

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