Home > #1, Film & convergence > Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows

The first movie I saw over break was Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Part One.  The film was released on November 19, 2010, and it is currently still playing in numerous theaters.

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows is an example of economic convergence in numerous ways. For example, both part one and part two of the last instillation of the Harry Potter series were “officially” filmed on a budget of $250 million.  The previous film in the series, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, was also filmed on a $250 million budget. Currently, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows has grossed right over nine hundred million dollars, and as previously mentioned it is currently in theatres. Also, the second part of the final instillation is scheduled to release in July 2011.  In addition, there were two production companies: Heyday Films and Warner Bros. Pictures, but also there are fifteen distributors that are located across the globe. Furthermore, there were at least twenty-four other agencies ranging from caters to the London Symphony Orchestra that were involved in the production process. All of these aspects demonstrate how economic convergence played a role in the production of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows.

Technological convergence was also a huge aspect of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows. There are fourteen companies credited for their contributions to the film’s special effects. Also, the whole Harry Potter film series is based off of the book series by J.K. Rowling. All of the vivid and seemingly impossible adventures of Harry Potter and his friends that were described in great detail in the novels had to be translated to the screen through intensive special effects. Technological convergence also appeared in the advertising. It was promoted globally in magazines, newspapers, radio ads, internet sidebars, and video trailers on television.

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows is the perfect example of cultural convergence. It began as a novel written by a British author, and the book series became a global sensation. The same goes for the movies, and the audience keeps growing more and more. The fan base grows as more is released, and there really is no age limit to Harry Potter followers. Also, it was interesting to see that the film has numerous official sites for all of the nations that are fans.

The film Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows is said to be one of the most successful films of the season, and most likely the roles of cultural, technological, and economic convergence played a role in its success.

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Categories: #1, Film & convergence Tags: ,
  1. Lynn
    January 6, 2011 at 3:50 am

    Good insights. I like that you identify the cross-platform advertising campaign as a way of seeing technological convergence. Another example is the way in which the HP series is franchised across various media: books, films, video games, board games, printed sheet music, etc.
    Economic convergence refers specifically to how different media companies are part of one integrated network with a single owner. E.g., if Warner Bros. owned the rights to the music performed by the London Symphony Orchestra, then Warner Bros. would be making more money from the film than they might have otherwise due to this economic convergence.
    To discuss how the HP series is an example of cultural convergence, can you talk about why you think the series holds appeal across the globe? (e.g., discuss some of the common experiences of growing up that might be confronted by young people everywhere and that are related in the series).

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